It’s ‘Soy’ Easy to Stick to Your Resolutions This New Year

Vitasoy mascot soybean

(press release from Vitasoy)

Some of the most common New Year’s resolutions we make are to do with food and diet. This year rather than denying yourself, why not make a few subtle changes instead? You don’t need to compromise on taste, convenience and health if you want to keep your resolutions. Finding tasty and easily accessible foods that pack a nutritional punch, such as soybeans and soymilk, will help you keep on track.  Here are some 2014 food resolutions to help make this year your healthiest, and yummiest, yet.

1. Eat less meat

It’s unusual for plants and vegetables to contain all nine of the essential amino acids necessary for growth, development and repair, but that’s what soy does. (1) What’s more, it’s low in saturated fat and cholesterol, which can be prevalent in animal sources of protein. Two glasses of Vitasoy Soy Milky each day will give you more than a third of your recommended daily intake (RDI) of high quality protein (something that almond or rice milk cannot do) but with the bonus of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.

2. Be adventurous

You don’t have to be lactose intolerant to enjoy soymilk. With so many different flavors on the market, people are now drinking soymilk for its taste as well as for its health benefits. Unlike other milks, soymilk is naturally low in lactose, making it a perfect addition for people who want to reduce their dairy load. Soymilk is suitable for hot drinks, on cereal and in smoothies as well as savory dishes. Maybe it’s time to give soy another shot!

3. Eat more superfoods

Soy is a superfood. The term superfood is applied when foods pack a lot of nutrients into often lower kilojoule packages – these foods are our best friend after an indulgent holiday season! Superfoods are also characterized by their superior sources of antioxidants and essential nutrients, that is, nutrients we need but that our bodies cannot make themselves. (2)

4. Fire up fibre intake

There’s more than 20g of fiber in 100g of soybeans. (3) Adults are advised to eat at least 25-30g of fiber per day, but most Australians don’t hit those targets, so they could be missing out on digestive benefits, weight management and heart health. (4) So get snacking on edamame beans or perhaps stir fry up a storm of tofu and vegetables if you want in on a piece of the fantastic fiber action!

5. Don’t forget the mighty minerals

We know good things come in small packages and that’s the story when it comes to the soybean. In addition to macronutrients like protein, soybeans contain iron, phosphorus, potassium and zinc that are necessary for healthy functioning of the body. (5)

6. Get more antioxidants

Soybeans are particularly rich in a type of antioxidant called isoflavones, containing about 50 times more than other members of the legume family! (6)

7. Swap bad fats for good fats

Fat? Shouldn’t we be avoiding that? Nope, not the good ones, anyway. Soybeans contain omega 3 and omega 6 polyunsaturated fats that build healthy cells, (7) like the ones in your blood and your brain. Soybeans also contain some monounsaturated fats (like those you find in olive oil and avocado (8)) and very little saturated fats. That’s good news for your heart!

8. Stay energised

Soy contains magnesium that can contribute to a reduction in tiredness and fatigue as well as normal psychological function. The magnesium works in synergy with other nutrients like calcium and phosphorus to utilize energy around the body. A glass of Vitasoy calcium enriched soymilk provides 16% of your RDI of magnesium. (9)

9. Strengthen your body

Soymilk fortified with calcium can be absorbed and used by the body just as well as cow’s milk. (10) We know that calcium develops and maintains our bones and teeth, but did you also know it’s required for correct muscle function, including your heart? (11) A glass of Vitasoy Calci-Plus Soymilk gives you 50% of your RDI of calcium. Bottoms up!

10. Eat local

Soybeans that are grown in Australia are not genetically modified. (12) As more comprehensive research has not been conducted in to the potential health risks of consuming GM foods, the least processed, guaranteed GM free choice is soymilk made with whole Australian soybeans. All Vitasoy soymilk products are made with whole soybeans.

We all know that making New Year’s resolutions is easy, but keeping them can be tricky. After all, we’re only human!

Making a change rather than going to extremes will make sticking to your resolutions ‘soy’ easy.

*Calcium enriched soymilk

References

(1) Michelfleder, A. J. 2009, Soy: a complete source of protein, Am Fam Physician, vol. 79(1), pp. 43-7.

(2) Oxford University Press 2013, Superfood: Definition of superfood in Oxford dictionary, accessed from: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/superfood

(3) NHMRC n.d., NHMRC nutrient reference values – Nutrients dietary, accessed from: http://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/dietary%20fibre.htm

(4) State Government of Victoria 2013, Fibre in food, accessed from: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Fibre_in_food

(5) NHMRC n.d., NHMRC nutrient reference values – Nutrients revised, accessed from: http://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/

(6) State Government of Victoria 2013, Soybeans, accessed from: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Soybeans

(7) NHMRC n.d., NHMRC nutrient reference values – Nutrients fat, accessed from: http://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/fat.htm

(8) State Government of Victoria 2013, Fats and oils, accessed from: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Fats_and_oils

(9) NHMRC n.d., NHMRC nutrient reference values – Nutrients magnesium, accessed from: http://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/magnesium.htm

(10) American Dietetic Association 2009, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Vegetarian fats, Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109(7), pp. 1266-1282.

(11) NHMRC n.d., NHMRC nutrient reference values – Nutrients calcium, accessed from: http://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/calcium.htm

(12) State Government of Victoria 2013, Genetically modified (GM) foods, accessed from: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcArticles.nsf/pages/Genetically_modified_foods?open