HORMONE INTAKE

Myth: Soy added to packaged foods raises hormone levels

Fact: Isoflavone intake for the average U.S. person is only 2.35 mg/day.

Isoflavone intake for the average U.S. person is only 2.35 mg/day or about the amount from one ounce of soymilk, calculated using the USDA database and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III 24-h dietary recall. Often the …

CALCIUM IN SOYMILK

Myth: Soymilk has less calcium than cow milk

Fact: Soymilk is the only dairy substitute nutritionally comparable to cow milk.

The amount of calcium in soymilk is equivalent to the amount of calcium in cow’s milk.? In addition to naturally occurring calcium in soybeans, soymilk is fortified with 300-400 milligrams of calcium (30-40% of daily value) per 8 ounces, along …

HEART DISEASE

Myth: Soy protein does not make much of a difference in lowering cholesterol.

Fact: It may help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease

Not true! Soy protein can help meet protein needs and the FDA authorized health claim for soy protein states that “25 grams of soy protein a day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce …

HYPOTHYROIDISM

Myth: Soyfoods can lead to hypothyroidism.

Fact: Soy does not adversely affect thyroid function in healthy people.

Soy does not adversely affect thyroid function in healthy people and does not need to be avoided for those taking medication for hypothyroidism. More than 20 clinical studies show that isoflavones do not adversely affect thyroid function in healthy people. …

ALLERGIES

Myth: Many people have soy allergies.

Fact: An allergy to milk protein is 80 times more common.

Not true! Although some do have allergies to soy protein, in comparison, an allergy to milk protein is 80 times more common. The College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology estimates that approximately 0.4% of American children, or about 298,410 under …

MALE FEMINIZATION

Myth: Soyfoods have feminizing effects on men.

Fact: Soyfoods do not feminize men or impair male fertility.

Not true! The preponderance of evidence shows that soyfoods do not feminize men or impair male fertility. Extensive clinical research shows that even large amounts of soy do not lower testosterone levels or raise estrogen levels in men. Clinical research …

BREAST CANCER

Myth: Breast cancer patients should avoid soyfoods.

Fact: Soyfoods are safe and may possibly even be beneficial for some breast cancer survivors

Not true! Recent human research shows that soyfoods are safe and may possibly even be beneficial for some breast cancer survivors and for some at high risk for breast cancer. A recent study followed more than 9,500 women in the …