Help Manage Diabetes and Gain Health

by Megan Malka

November is National Diabetes Month, and with Halloween not too far behind us and the holiday season right around the corner, it is important to talk about sugar and its impact on health.   According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes affects 26 million Americans, including 7 million people who are undiagnosed.  Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.  Medical professionals recommend several ways to manage the symptoms of diabetes and help decrease the risk of developing diabetes.  These include a balanced diet, physical activity and weight loss (if overweight).  Research has shown that small steps toward a healthy lifestyle and weight loss play a significant role in managing and preventing diabetes.

So where do soyfoods come in? Soyfoods, as part of a balanced diet, can aid in gaining control of diabetes.  In the diet, carbohydrates are mainly responsible for raising blood sugar while protein helps blood sugar remain level.  Soy protein is a high quality, lean source of protein that has been found to improve glycemic (blood sugar) control.  Furthermore, protein-based snacks can help keep blood sugar under control and help you stay full longer.  Recent studies show a soy nutrition bar, high in protein and fiber, lowers the increase in blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes.[i],[ii]

Soyfoods can help you achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. In general, soyfoods contain fewer calories, less total fat and saturated fat, and more fiber than other sources of high-quality protein.

Food for Thought for the Holiday Season

The holidays are times of tradition and enjoying delicious recipes that have been passed down in the family for generations.  To enjoy traditional family recipes while maintaining your health, try eating smaller portions.  A good trick to limit your portion size is to use a smaller plate so that when you fill your plate you will in fact have less food on your plate – thus limiting your caloric intake.  Another trick is to try to enjoy the first helpings of your meal and avoid going for seconds or even thirds!  If you are looking to make your recipes a little healthier while not hurting the taste, check out these healthy cooking and baking substitutions from the Mayo Clinic or our tips for cooking with soyfoods.

 

Recipes

Tofurky Holiday VarietiesTofurky Holiday Varieties

 

 

 

House Foods tofu pumpkin pie

Pumpkin Pie
from House foods

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin Spice Latte from Silk

Pumpkin Spice Latte
from Silk

 

 

 

 

Links Worth Checking Out

As always be sure to check us out on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest for more great recipes and interesting facts about soyfoods. Check out our YouTube page featuring with videos hosted by food and nutrition expert Rebecca Scritchfield, RD.

 

My name is Meghan.  I have a Masters of Public Health in Nutrition from the University of North Carolina and I will soon acquire the Registered Dietitian license.  So you could say I am an “RD to be.”  You can be sure that all of the information here is based on scientific research and in line with the recommendations of national health organizations and agencies.  We bring you the science, connect you to the recipes and so let us know what you like and what you want to know.

References

[i] Urita et al (2012) Effects of a soybean nutrition bar on postprandial blood glucose and lipid levels in patients with diabetes mellitus.

[ii] Dove et al. (2011) Lupin and soya reduce glycemia acutely in type 2 diabetes.

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